Tribal Natural Resources

Tribal Natural Resources

Native American tribes around the West are making critical decisions regarding the management of their natural resources — land, water, fossil fuels and renewable resources. The Tribal Natural Resources Desk aims to produce objective reporting to tell stories of tribes empowering themselves through stewardship and decision-making around their natural resources.
The number of coronavirus cases on the Navajo Nation is multiplying rapidly. As of Thursday, there are 241 people with the virus and eight confirmed deaths. The CDC says Native Americans are some of the most vulnerable to the coronavirus because of economic, geographic, and health conditions.
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Navajo Access To Water Compounds Response To Coronavirus
As health officials urge us to wash hands to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, two million Americans without access to clean running water have become some of the most vulnerable. On Tuesday the Navajo Nation reported 49 cases of COVID-19.
Havasupai Tribe Declares State Of Emergency
The Havasupai Tribe has declared a state of emergency over the coronavirus, which has not yet spread to the community of 700 that lives at the bottom of the Grand Canyon.
Ajo Cafe Promotes Healthy Living, Educates About Sustainable Indigenous Crops
Until around 10 years ago, Ajo, Arizona, fit the description of a "literal" food desert. A local nonprofit decided to change that label and partnered with members of the Tohono O’odham tribe to farm traditional and indigenous crops in the area.
Conservationists: Oil Drilling Plan Doesnt Do Enough To Protect Chaco
The federal government released a new management plan for oil and gas drilling in the Greater Chaco Canyon area. Conservationists and some tribal members say it doesn’t go far enough to protect the environment and cultural sites.
Border Patrol Pushes Back Against Accusations Of Monument Desecration On Arizona Border
The U.S. Border Patrol unfolded its public demonstration Wednesday of the explosive force used to make way for a large border fence on the border road of the protected monument. Border Patrol officials pushed back against accusations they are desecrating areas of land sacred to the Tohono O’odham Nation in southern Arizona.
On 101st Anniversary Of Grand Canyon Park, Tribes Remind Visitors Of Their Ties
Wednesday is the 101st anniversary of Grand Canyon National Park. To commemorate, a group of Native leaders has launched a project to remind visitors long before it was a national park, the Grand Canyon was a place of great significance to several tribes.
Navajo Nation Wants To Provide Power To LA
Navajo President Jonathan Nez will attend a Los Angeles City Council meeting Wednesday to discuss a proposed partnership. The tribe wants to provide the city with 500 megawatts of clean energy.
Research: Closing Coal Power Plants Benefits People, Crops
Last year's coal-fired power plant closures include the Navajo Generating Station in northeastern Arizona. New data from the University of California San Diego shows benefits to both human health and agriculture in the areas around those shuttered plants.
Apache Chef Uses Food As Medicine For His People
A decade ago, it looked like Chef Nephi Craig was on the verge of something big. He had left a burgeoning international career in the restaurant industry to come back home to Whiteriver, Arizona, a small town on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in eastern Arizona, where his people — the White Mountain Apaches — are from.
Will Sales Taxes Help Tribes Bounce Back From A Development Ban?
The Navajo Nation and the Hopi Tribe were, until recently, subject to a ban on development under what was known as the “Bennett Freeze.” To find out more out that piece of history and how it’s impacted communities, The Show spoke with Mark Trahant, editor of Indian Country Today.
Navajo President: China Trade Deal Would Benefit Tribes
The Navajo president said the trade agreement that the Trump administration and China signed Wednesday would open doors for tribes.
Navajo, SRP Take Steps To Make Solar A Priority
The Navajo Nation is taking steps to make solar energy a priority, with the help of Salt River Project. Salt River Project seeks proposals for up to 200 megawatts of solar development on the Navajo Nation.
After Revenue Loss From Coal, Hopi Scramble To Fill Budget Gap
When the Navajo Generating Station and the Peabody Coal Mine shut down late last year, they took with them royalties that the Hopi Tribe depended on for more than four decades. Hopi leaders have known this day would come, yet they left it up to the current tribal council to replace that revenue generator.
Life After Coal: Moving On From The Navajo Generating Station
The Salt River Project announced it would close the Navajo Generating Station two years ago. That started a domino effect on the Navajo Nation. In November, the Kayenta Mine and the coal fired power plant closed, and hundreds of jobs were lost. Now new sources of energy are beginning to sprout.
Hopi Tribe Vets Coal Bed Methane Companies
The Hopi Tribe is vetting a group that has proposed an idea that could generate revenue, jobs and electricity for the tribe. Two Native-owned businesses called Northrock Technology and United Rain have proposed technology used for many years outside the U.S. to harvest coal bed methane, a form of natural gas.
EPA Fines Hopi Over Arsenic In Drinking Water
Federal officials have fined the Hopi Tribe for failing to reduce arsenic levels in its drinking water at the Hopi Cultural Center. The Hopi Tribe has agreed to pay the $3,800 fine and to finish building a treatment system by early next year.
Tribes, Groups Oppose Grand Canyon Dams
A Phoenix company is asking the federal government for preliminary permits to study two dam projects along the Little Colorado River on the Navajo Reservation. But tribes, conservation groups, and the Arizona Department of Game and Fish are speaking out.
EPA Sending Money To Tribes For Environmental Projects
The federal government is sending almost $29 million to tribes in the region for water infrastructure and environmental protection.
Report: Native Americans Have Most Trouble Accessing Water
For many of us turning on the tap or flushing the toilet is something we take for granted. But a report released Monday showed more than 2 million Americans live without these conveniences. And Native Americans are more likely to have trouble accessing water than any other group.
Navajo Nation President Halts NTEC Purchase Of Coal Plants
Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez announced this week he is pulling the plug on the Navajo Transitional Energy Company's controversial purchases of three bankrupt coal mines in Wyoming and Montana last month.

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